Get Like Me:

Ashleigh. Young and Still Searching. Avid Complainer. Untamed Lioness. Fat and Perfect.

Read Before You Follow Me:

My page contains posts about racism, sexism, heteronormativity and homophobia, gender and sexuality, fat politics and thin privilege, rape culture and consent, ableism, cissexism and trans*- phobia/ misogyny, and general information about institutionalized oppressive power structures. Please do not message me about being racist against white people or being sexist against men. If you do not understand the concepts of privilege and oppression and institutional oppressive power structures, then I suggest you seek information and education elsewhere before critiquing my posts.

*If you need something tagged for trigger warnings or for Tumblr Savior that I missed, please let me know! I apologize in advance if I do not tag something appropriately.*
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curvesincolor:

Amber Rose. 

curvesincolor:

Amber Rose. 

gnarly:

when your teacher asks u why ur late to class

image

Reblog5 days ago with 14,954 notes

estpolis:

people say lmao a lot nowadays but no one says rofl anymore and its weird cause back in the day rofl and lmao used to be interchangeable and if you were a risktaker youd combine them into roflmao but now everyones dropped rofl. its probably for the best but i cant help but be nostalgic.

Reblog5 days ago with 50,550 notes
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dianeaudreyngako:

Winnie Harlow is the new face of Desigual. 

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de-la-ohso:

laidbackmack:

Jamie Foxx & Kevin Hart

forever reblogging.

de-la-ohso:

laidbackmack:

Jamie Foxx & Kevin Hart

forever reblogging.

timeanddisregard:

It seems like cats never forgot the fact that they were worshipped as gods thousands of years ago 

Reblog5 days ago with 96,353 notes

“You’re tired of hearing about it? Think about how fucking exhausting it is living it.”

Jon Stewart regarding racism.  (via anotherwellkeptsecret)

!!!!!!!!

(via black—lamb)

Reblog5 days ago with 15,436 notes

onnaollie:

Y’all make fun of a baby’s natural hair, and then you dog out black women who wear sew ins and weaves.

Because y’all call Blue Ivy’s hair unkept, and then say Beyonce is a fake bitch for wearing sew ins and what not.

It’s not about hair. You hate black women period. 

Reblog6 days ago with 10,963 notes
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absolutelyasianamerican:

Because I fear that many AsAms today are forgetting our history of solidarity with black lives and black power.  

We must not forget. 

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sica49:

prettybrowneyezzz:

lt-laularryaddict:

livelaughloveatrandom:

Yessuh

Lau’s sexy stare

I’M SO FEELING THE WHITE NECK WARMER AND THE GOLD CHAIN BACKWARDS… UMMMMMMMMM HUMMMMMMM

Yesss to theeee!!! I replayed that stare down 57 times!!! And will continue to do so

sica49:

prettybrowneyezzz:

lt-laularryaddict:

livelaughloveatrandom:

Yessuh

Lau’s sexy stare

I’M SO FEELING THE WHITE NECK WARMER AND THE GOLD CHAIN BACKWARDS… UMMMMMMMMM HUMMMMMMM

Yesss to theeee!!! I replayed that stare down 57 times!!! And will continue to do so

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queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

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blcksupremacy:

☀💙channeling the last lil bits of warmth and positivity from summer💙☀